Aatul Palandurkar

140 Ways to Work From Home

Since 2012, I have earned my full-time living freelancing online. And I can help you do the same from anywhere in the world.

Ready to ditch your 9-5 job?

It might be easier to start working from home than you think.

The great thing about freelancing is that you get to be in business for yourself – with every little upfront investment or risk.

But one of the most common myths I hear is that in order to succeed as a freelancer, you must be a freelance writer or designer.

As it turns out, nothing could be further from the truth.

What I have put together for you here is a list of 140 different possible services you could offer to start building your online, service-based business.

I hope you find it useful.

Download Ebook from here: https://www.instamojo.com/aatulpalandurkar/140-ways-to-work-from-home/

To your unlimited success,
Aatul Palandurkar
International Trainer and Author

After you’ve landed your first interview for a tech position, you’ll want to make sure you’re prepared to not only say the right things but to avoid saying the wrong things. There are lots of things you can say wrong in an interview; let’s dig into some things to avoid.

 

Top 5 job interview mistakes: How to Avoid

 

5 job interview mistakes:

 

Don’t assume the person interviewing you is non-technical and doesn’t know the answers

I made this mistake eons ago in my very first interview out of college. I assumed the guy interviewing me was some mid-level manager who had no technical skills, and I thought I could outdo him. Wrong. He asked me if I had ever used any tools belonging to a certain toolset, and I said yes, thinking that would be it. He asked, “Which ones?” I was unable to answer and it made for an awkward moment… and also a lack of job offer.

Don’t criticize the questions

Fortunately, trick interview questions are beginning to go by the wayside; however, there’s still a possibility you’re going to encounter them at unexpected moments. (Specifically, “trick” questions are puzzle-y ones like, “How many gas stations are there in the country?” Google was a big fan of these, back in the day.)

The problem with these questions is they’re typically difficult to answer correctly without being given a lot of additional data; alternatively, many (such as the infamous “Why are manhole covers round?” question) hinge on whether you’ve happened to memorize a correct answer at some point. In general, though, trick questions are designed to see whether the applicant can logically work their way through a problem.

People interviewing for senior-level positions with 10 or 15 years of experience might get away with being arrogant during questions like this and pointing out their absurdity, but if you’re interviewing for an entry-level position, don’t respond with anything other than sincerity. Don’t say how ridiculous the question is, and don’t criticize the interviewer for thinking that such queries can actually determine how you think. Instead, take the question seriously, and give it your best shot.

 

No, you are not their savior

I’ve interviewed many young software developers who seem to assume that our shop is in total shambles, with problems so insurmountable that we need them (and only them!) to save the day. But they’re wrong. In fact, at many companies, things are usually going okay, if not splendidly. Please don’t go into an interview thinking that, if you hadn’t swept in at that moment, the whole place is going to collapse. It isn’t.

 

Don’t be too “unconfident.”

While overconfidence (not to mention outright arrogance) can ruin an entry-level interview, underconfidence can be just as bad. Although nobody wants to work with somebody who is arrogant towards other people, we also don’t want the other extreme: somebody who is scared to even take one step forward and needs their handheld constantly.

Go into the interview with confidence. Yes, you do know Python well for somebody just getting started; yes, you do know how to spin up an EC2 server on AWS. No, you’re not an expert with 15 years of experience; but you do know what needs to be done, and you know that you’ll have lots of opportunities to learn even more.

 

Don’t brag about things that all your classmates have also accomplished

When I was just out of college, I thought that I could brag about the sheer number of programming languages I knew and that the interviewers would be astounded by my knowledge. But what I failed to recognize was that virtually every college student who graduated that year also knew those very same languages.

 

Conclusion

As you can see, surviving your first tech interview means walking a very careful line. You’re still green, and the person interviewing you will see through any attempts to act like you’re on the same skill level as a seasoned professional. But you also don’t want to appear meek and frightened. You want to have the confidence of an experienced technologist, but with the humbleness of somebody relatively new… who is ready to learn whatever it takes to move forward in the profession.

To your unlimited success…

When you are ready to step into the professional world, you need to compile all the necessary information about yourself in the form of a document. This document allows recruiters to understand if you are eligible for a job position.

There are two ways of creating the document, with one being a CV and the other a resume. You may have come across job postings where some employers ask for a CV while others ask for a resume and few of them accept both.

If such posts made you question how a CV is different from a resume, then you are in the right place. While both the documents are used for job applications, there are some key differences between them. Learning these differences will enable you to prepare an appropriate document for your job application.

 

What is a CV? CV Vs. Resume – Know the 7 Difference

The CV stands for Curriculum Vitae, a Latin phrase that means “course of life”. A CV is a comprehensive document that enlists every little detail of your accomplishments rather than presenting a simple career overview. A CV includes details of your education and professional career along with any other achievements like special honors, awards, and publications.

A CV, typically written in chronological order is usually two or three pages long but can be extended to more pages if required. CVs remain constant and do not change for different job positions. When applying for jobs using CV, your cover letters should be written differently according to each position.

 

What is a Resume?

Resume comes from the French term résumé that means “to sum up”. Resumes are concise documents that summarise your educational background, skills and talents, and career history. The objective of a resume is to share a brief outline of your professional history with employers.

A good resume is no more than two pages long as the intended recruiters will not spend the document for very long.

A resume, unlike a CV, is not static. It is targeted at a specific audience and needs to be adapted to every job that you apply for. While resumes do not have to follow a chronological order, many applicants often list their work history in reverse-chronological order with the most recent job at the beginning.

A resume usually includes sections like contact information, a summary or an objective, education, work experience, skills, etc.

 

Usage Per Region

The usage of the documents varies from country to country.

If you are in Canada or the US, you will find a resume as the preferred document for job application across disciplines. In these countries, a CV is used for only two scenarios: applying for jobs abroad or applying for jobs in the academic or research-centric positions.

In mainland Europe, including the UK and Ireland, as well as New Zealand there is no such thing as a resume. In these countries, the term CV is equivalent to the content of a resume with a concise, targeted document used for job applications.

In India, South Africa, and Australia, CV and resume mean the same thing. The term CV is used mostly for a public service job application while a resume is common when applying for private companies.

 

What are the Differences?

At first glance, CV and resume might look similar to you.

Format

CV

  • CVs contain exhaustive details of each aspect of your achievement including education, skillsets, and career history
  • CVs are much longer and can go beyond two to three pages

Resume

  • Resumes are short descriptions of your professional history
  • Resumes highlight your work experiences and skills and mention specifics only when needed
  • The purpose of a resume is to help understand the recruiter whether you are eligible for the role
  • Resumes typically do not exceed more than two pages

Order of Events

CV

  • A CV follows a chronological order where your achievements are listed according to the time they took place
  • A CV allows an employer to follow your professional growth curve

Resume

  • A resume can be designed in three ways: chronologically, functionally, and combined order

 

Choosing CV and Resume According to Usage

A CV provides an in-depth understanding of your current position in your career. This makes it the best candidate for use in the academic sphere. The exhaustive list of your educational qualification, skills, publications, awards, and work history allows academic institutes to evaluate you better.

Resumes, on the other hand, are best suited for the private sector companies, especially when you are applying for positions in IT or technology industries. These sectors receive numerous applications throughout the year making it impossible for a recruiter to go through the detailed CV of each applicant. Resumes being crisp, to the point documents tailored for specific jobs are a popular choice for recruiters and employers.

The points mentioned in this post are all you need to know about what a CV and a resume are and how they can be used. If you are still unsure of which one to go with, you can always reach out to the recruiter for more information. In case that is not possible, sticking to resume is a safer option since it is a concise document highlighting your skills.

Hope you found this article useful. If yes, hit the like button and share it.

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